How to Stop Procrastinating

It’s not even that we don’t want to do it. Sometimes the things we procrastinate are actually kind of enjoyable—once we get going, that is. Regardless, we’re all faced with tasks that feel like a chore, and they’re somehow able to make us incredibly productive in other areas. Isn’t it strange how past-due paperwork can spur a deep clean of the kitchen? And the reverse can also happen, where the stack of dishes becomes the harbinger of brilliant creative projects. The following is a list of tips to try to clear the clutter and get to the task at hand.

1. Make Yourself  a List
To-do lists are a particularly wonderful tool for those of us prone to anxiety and feelings of being overwhelmed and overloaded. They provide us with a way to compartmentalize our tasks, so that we can stop swimming in a great soup of stuff, and start seeing a nice, linear outline. They work for pretty much any sort of task.
For instance, household chores are easy to scribble down and stick on the fridge. But even our long-term, more complex goals can be broken down into a series of steps. Those big where-do-you-see-yourself-in-five-years questions can be tracked in a journal of neat lists. The key is to break them down into palatable portions. (Sort of like tearing up bits of lettuce to prevent a leafy green overdose.) Recently, I participated in National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo), and the experience was rife with the opportunity to procrastinate. The idea of writing a novel of at least 50 000 words, complete with plot, characters, and of course, legible sentences, was so daunting that I questioned my ability to get it done.However, as soon as I had a list complete with daily quotas and targets, I found it much easier to get to work.

How can you break your tasks up? To which tasks do you give priority? It can also be helpful to include rewards at this point. Likely, crossing items from a to-do list will provide a little dopamine rush from your brain’s pleasure centre, but if you’re really struggling with something, make sure you treat yourself afterwards.

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How will I manage to get through all six tasks?

2. Clear up your Environment
Even the most prolific among us would struggle to get stuff done in a place with too much stimuli, but that doesn’t mean we all have the same ideal work environment. Some of us crave the minimalist room with a simple desk and chair, and some of us need the espresso-and-Michael-Bubblé background sounds of coffee shops to get in our zone. It’s good to be flexible: we can’t always work in our ideal spaces, and we can’t allow that to inhibit our work flow. (But wouldn’t we love to use that as an excuse sometimes?)

Sometimes it’s simply a matter of putting on the right soundtrack. Personally, I’m a fan of ambient music and instrumental tracks when I need to focus. That way, I don’t get sidetracked by provocative lyrics. (And I’m less prone to chair-dancing.)

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Meet me on the dance floor!

3. Do your Creativity Ritual
If it feels wrong to get to work without a hot cup of coffee or a protein shake, then by all means, bottoms up! Being productive is not about deprivation, after all—no need to flagellate oneself when the task at hand already feels like torture.

If anxiety is the issue (and with procrastination, it often is), then get some air. It’s perfectly fine to get a stroll in, as long as the stroll doesn’t become a cross-country attempt to escape the impending deadline. More tips on getting a creativity ritual can be found here.

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My ritual is to play every single game my boyfriend owns before I can work.

4. Try Some Different Methods
I have a friend who uses a wonderful strategy to get her work done. She sets a timer and works hard for 25 minutes, and then takes a 5 minute break to check her emails and give her brain a rest. This technique is one among many others, all of which suggest different ratios of work and rest. (Some call for 90 minutes of work with a 15 minute break, and of course, there is the classic schedule that retail workers are familiar with in which two 15 minute breaks and one half-hour break pepper their 8 hour work day.) The idea is that we may be less prone to burning out, particularly on tasks which we’re not passionate about, if we give our brains and bodies time to rest.

On the other hand, it’s nice to give ourselves the opportunity to get into that strange feeling of “flow” — that feeling where time ceases to exist because we’re so enveloped in the task at hand. There could be a garden-gnome rebellion in full swing, and we wouldn’t even lift our heads.

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Oh, I know you aren’t so innocent.

5. Don’t Make Excuses
I apologize sincerely for making this point, because as a fellow procrastinator, I know it’s not something we like to hear. After all, these are the words that every nagging person has ever uttered in our presence, and they’re almost always the words we tell ourselves deep in the recesses of our critical minds.

But alas, sometimes we just need to get ‘er done. Start small or start big, but start somewhere.

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Take a deep breath and get it done. I believe in you.